Tax: Individual

COVID-Image-3-1.jpg?fit=900%2C628&ssl=1
March 12, 2021

The American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) has been signed into law by President Biden and makes significant updates to several tax provisions to alleviate some of the pandemic's financial burdens for individual taxpayers and businesses. Updates include expansions and extensions of various tax credits such as the employee retention credit (ERC), COBRA continuation coverage, Affordable Care Act (ACA) subsidies, and more. The bill also includes $1.46 billion for the IRS to manage the additional responsibilities on top of the annual tax filing season. Here are the critical tax updates.

COVID-Image-4.jpg?fit=900%2C628&ssl=1
March 12, 2021

The American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) of 2021 passed Congress and President Biden signed the bill into law on March 12, 2021. The ARPA approves $1.9 trillion in spending for individuals, businesses, governments, and certain industries impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The third Act in a year, the ARPA approves additional economic impact payments for individuals; the extension of federal unemployment benefits; additional funds for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Loans, and Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) for hard-hit small businesses; and grants for food and beverage establishments. Here are the key individual and business provisions in the bill.

the-white-house-1623005_1920-1.jpg?fit=1200%2C683&ssl=1
December 27, 2020

The U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate passed, and the President has signed, the Coronavirus Response & Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act. The agreement comes after weeks of negotiations and two funding extensions to keep Congress open until a bill was passed with a $1.4 trillion government-wide funding plan. The $900 billion coronavirus relief portion includes another round of Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funding, extended unemployment benefits, and direct payments to taxpayers. Here’s an overview of the key provisions in the bill.

office-932926_1280.jpg?fit=1200%2C800&ssl=1
December 21, 2020

The pandemic created by the novel coronavirus has drastically changed the way we live and work. As more businesses are forced to send their employees home, work-from-home life has become a mainstay especially in knowledge-based jobs (jobs that do not require physical labor), and many of these industries are not going back to the workplace anytime soon. This can create wrinkles for both employers and employees when it comes to their tax situations.

tax-468440_960_720.jpg?fit=960%2C640&ssl=1
November 24, 2020

Reviewing your tax situation each year prior to filing is essential to ensuring your compliance is up to date and opportunities have been optimized. This guide contains strategies to help you save on your taxes if enacted before year-end. For assistance or further detail, contact your Goering & Granatino team member at (913) 396-6225. 

tax-credit32641509978_1116a91870_b.jpg?fit=1023%2C774&ssl=1
March 31, 2020

On March 27, President Trump signed a historic stimulus bill: the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. This legislation’s many provisions provide emergency relief for those suffering financial hardships due to COVID-19 including individuals, businesses, state and local governments, and the health care system. The CARES Act is in addition to the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) which President Trump signed into law on March 18. FFCRA makes substantial changes to sick and family and medical leave for businesses and employees amid the emerging COVID-19 pandemic.

help-2478193_1920.jpg?fit=1200%2C900&ssl=1
March 23, 2020

It was announced on March 20 that Tax Day would be postponed from April 15 to July 15 to coincide with the delayed tax payment deadline at the direction of President Trump. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin announced the postponement via Twitter, stating that all taxpayers and businesses will have until July 15 to file and make payments without interest or penalties. We know you have lots of questions. Below is a summary of the 10 most common questions and the IRS’s response.